Hurricane season begins on June 1, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicts a strong likelihood that the next seven months will bring an above-average number of tropical storms and hurricanes in 2022. According to NOAA, it’s the seventh consecutive above-normal season.

It’s impossible to know exactly how many there will be in a given season, or where they’ll hit. But we do know they will disproportionately impact low-wealth communities, communities of color, renters, the elderly and disabled, and other historically underserved and oppressed people. 

Advocates across the Gulf and Atlantic Coasts have spent months preparing for what may come. They’re working in communities often failed by federal and state agencies—communities still recovering from storms that stretch back one, two, even five years: Laura, Delta, Ida, Florence, Harvey, and Michael. 

Southerly works with community partners to determine information needs, creates resources and stories online and offline, and distributes them through trusted on-the-ground networks.

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‘Make copies of everything’: Documents to have in case of a hurricane

Many Americans turn to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for help in the long road to recovery after a disaster. The agency is tasked with providing individuals with financial assistance for a variety of situations, from home repairs to medical expenses.  You can only apply for aid if the natural disaster you were impacted…

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